Jenny Burcio

Women in Tech Week Profile: Amn Rahman

Jenny Burcio

We’re continuing our celebration of Women in Tech Week with another profile of one of many of the amazing women who make a tremendous impact at Docker – this week, and every week – helping developers build modern apps. 

Amn Rahman is a Data Engineer. You can follow her on Twitter @amnrahman.

What is your job?

I work as a data engineer – building and maintaining data pipelines and delivery tools for the entire company. 

How long have you worked at Docker?

2 years. 

Is your current role one that you always intended on your career path? 

Not quite! As a teenager, I wanted to become a cryptographer and spent most of my time in undergrad and grad school on research in privacy and security. I eventually realized I liked working with data and was pretty good at dealing with databases, which pushed me into my current role. 

What is your advice for someone entering the field?

Become acquainted with the entire data journey and try to pick up one tool or language for each phase. For example, you may choose to use Python to fetch and transform data from an API and load it in a MySQL database and then expose the data using a BI tool like Tableau.  In the process, you’ll develop a mental model for a data pipeline and will be able to categorize each new tool or pipeline you come across. 

Never be afraid to ask questions and do not get overwhelmed by all that is out there! When applying for jobs, do not worry about meeting 100% of the qualifications!

Tell us about a favorite moment or memory at Docker or from your career? 

Delivering a live demo in the Dockercon keynote! 

What are you working on right now that you are excited about?

I’m working on various exciting projects right now: helping Customer Success in efficiently tracking customer requests and support backlog, providing analytics to HR to track diversity, and surfacing product telemetry for product managers.  

What do you do to get “unstuck” on a really difficult problem/design/bug?

There’s a running joke in my team that I simply sleep on it! I’ve woken up many times with solutions and bug fixes in my head. Sometimes I just like to step away from my computer and phone and just grab a pen and paper or attack a whiteboard and go through the problem step by step. We get so caught up in jumping from one task to the next that we forget to make time for deep reflection. It’s usually in moments like these that I find answers to problems bugging me. 

What is your superpower?

Making people laugh at ridiculous jokes! On a more serious note, communication. 

What is your definition of success?

Bringing a positive impact to lives other than yours. 

What are you passionate about?

Tech for social good, mentoring women in tech and female students, promoting more mindfulness in the use of technology, standing against addictive and biased design patterns and algorithms, creating inclusive spaces and communities. 

Who do you look up to?

Abdul Sattar Edhi – one of the greatest humanitarians to walk the earth. He spent his entire life dedicated to serving the poor and the ill through the world’s largest volunteer run ambulance network and shelters. 

What is something you love to do? And something you dislike?

I love to build stuff whether it’s assembling IKEA furniture or geeking out on an Arduino. I also love to read poetry! And I have an intense dislike for washing dishes! 

Share a story about something or someone who has been very impactful on your life or career?

My undergrad advisor, Dr. Fareed Zaffar at the Lahore University of Management Sciences pushed me into applying to graduate schools when I had no plans of doing so and didn’t believe in myself. I ended up getting accepted by some of the most prestigious universities in the world and I owe him a great deal for being where I am today. He continues to be a mentor who I regularly reach out to for advice.