Bill Mills

In this series’ final installment, I’ll explain how to provision storage to a Kubernetes application. The final component we want to think about when we build applications for Kubernetes is storage. Remember, a container’s filesystem is transient, and any data kept there is at risk of being deleted along with your container if that container ever exits or is rescheduled. If we want to guarantee that data lives beyond the short lifecycle of a container, we must write it out to external storage.

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Bill Mills

One of the core design principles of any containerized app must be portability. A well-designed application should treat configuration like an independent object, separate from the containers themselves, that’s provisioned to them at runtime. That way, when you move your app from one environment to another, you don’t need to rewrite any of your containers or controllers; you simply provide a configuration object appropriate to this new environment, leaving everything else untouched.

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Bill Mills

Kubernetes networking model says that any pod can reach any other pod at the target pod’s IP by default, but discovering those IPs and maintaining that list while pods are potentially being rescheduled — resulting in them getting an entirely new IP — by hand would be a lot of tedious, fragile work. In this post, I’ll explain how to configure networking services in Kubernetes to allow pods to communicate reliably with each other.

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Bill Mills

I reviewed the basic setup for building applications in Kubernetes in part 1 of this blog series. In this post, I’ll explain how to use pods and controllers to create scalable processes for managing your applications. The heart of any application is its running processes, and in Kubernetes we fundamentally create processes as pods. Pods are a bit fancier than individual containers, in that they can schedule whole groups of containers, co-located on a single host.

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Bill Mills

Kubernetes’ complexity is overwhelming for a lot of people jumping in for the first time. In this blog series, I’m going to walk you through the basics of architecting an application for Kubernetes, with a tactical focus on the actual Kubernetes objects you’re going to need.

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David Hamdani

Docker 3.0 is GA today – the only desktop-to-cloud enterprise container platform enabling organizations to build and share any application and securely run them anywhere – from hybrid cloud to the edge.

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Jim Armstrong

When Docker Enterprise added support for Windows containers running on Swarm with the release of Windows Server 2016, we had to tackle challenges that are less pervasive in pure Linux environments.

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Katie Strange

Last week, Docker hosted our 4th annual Mid-Atlantic and Government Docker Summit, a one-day technology conference held on Wednesday, May 29 near Washington, DC. Over 425 attendees in the public and private sector came together to share and learn about the trends driving change in IT from containers, cloud and DeVops. Specifically, the presenters shared content on topics including Docker Enterprise, our industry-leading container platform, Docker’s Kubernetes Service, Container Security and more. Attendees were a mix of technology users and IT decision makers: everyone from developers, systems admins and architects to Sr. leaders and CTOs. Summit Recap by the Numbers: 428…

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