Posts by: Mike Coleman

Mike Coleman

With KubeCon EU happening in Copenhagen, we looked back at the most popular posts with our readers on Docker and Kubernetes. For those of you that have yet to try Docker EE 2.0, this blog highlights how in Docker for Desktops you can use Docker compose to directly deploy an application onto a Kubernetes cluster.  If you’re running an edge version of Docker on your desktop (Docker for Mac or Docker for Windows Desktop), you can now stand up a single-node Kubernetes cluster with the click of a button. While I’m not a developer, I think this is great news for the…

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Mike Coleman

If you’re running an edge version of Docker on your desktop (Docker for Mac or Docker for Windows Desktop), you can now stand up a single-node Kubernetes cluster with the click of a button. While I’m not a developer, I think this is great news for the millions of developers who have already been using Docker on their Macbook or Windows laptop because they now have a fully compliant Kubernetes cluster at their fingertips without installing any other tools. Developers using Docker to build containerized applications often build Docker Compose files to deploy them. With the integration of Kubernetes into the…

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Mike Coleman

Last week we released the latest beta for Docker Enterprise Edition. Without a doubt one of the most significant features in this release is providing a single management control plane for both Swarm and Kubernetes-based clusters – including clusters made up of both Swarm and Kubernetes workers. This offers customers unparalleled choice in how they manage both their traditional and cloud native applications. When we were looking at doing this release we knew we couldn’t just slap a GUI on top of Kubernetes and call it good. We wanted to find areas where we could simplify and secure the deployment of  applications…

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Mike Coleman

I’ve been at Docker for just over two years now, and I’ve worked with every version of Docker Enterprise Edition (née Docker Datacenter) since before there even was a Docker Enterprise Edition (EE). I’m more excited about this new release than any previous release. There are several new features that are going to ease the management of your applications (both traditional and cloud-native) wherever you need them to run: the cloud or the data center, virtual or physical, Linux or Windows – and now even IBM Z mainframes. It would take too long to discuss all of the new features, so with…

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Mike Coleman

On June 27th I presented a webinar on “Docker for the SysAdmin”.  The webinar was driven by a common scenario I’m seeing: A sysadmin is sitting at her desk minding her own business when a developer walks in and says “here’s the the new app, it’s in a Docker image. Please deploy it ASAP”. This session is designed to help provides some guidance on how sysadmins should think about managing Dockerized applications in production. In any case, I was a bit long-winded (as usual), and didn’t have time to answer all the Q&A during the webinar (and there were quite a…

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Mike Coleman

Recently I was giving a talk at a trade show on the basics of Docker, and how an application goes from an idea to being a production workload running on a Universal Control Plane managed Swarm cluster. As part of that talk, I spent a bit of time talking about how containers are not VMs. This was especially relevant as most of the attendees currently worked as virtualization sysadmins. During the QA portion of the session one of the attendees asked me “When does my application go in a VM and when does it go in a container?”

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Mike Coleman

I have had a version of the following conversation more than a few times with community members trying to sort out where to run their containerized apps in production: User: So, where should I run my containers? Bare metal or VM’s Me: It’s not a question of “either / or” – that’s the beauty of Docker. That choice is based solely on what’s right for your application and business goals – physical or virtual, cloud or on premise. Mix and match as your application and business needs dictate (and change). User: But, surely you have a recommendation. Me: I’m going…

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Mike Coleman

In what appears to be a recurring theme (which I promise I’ll move off of soon), I’m going to spend some time talking about what Docker isn’t – Docker is not application virtualization. I spent a good amount of time at VMware where I worked on VMware View (which begat Horizon View which begat Horizon 7), so I’m more than a bit familiar with desktop and application virtualization. And, I understand why some people, when they first hear us talk about leveraging Docker for application portability they think along the lines of App-V, XenApp or ThinApp.

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